On Americans & Violent Revolution 1

Through my 20’s, I’ve grown increasingly obsessed with character and effectiveness.
In the process, I’ve continuously examined my feelings on violence, warriorship and revolution.
I’ve consequently grown disillusioned with the American leftist obsession with violent revolution. I’m not a pacifist, but I do try to avoid physical aggression, even when it’s directed my way.

While I disdain timid attempts at reform and action-less intellectual theorizing, way too many leftist activists I’ve known have an itchy Molotov hand that I find morally questionable.

By no means is this an indictment of rioters [I believe that “A riot is the language of the unheard”].

It’s simply part of an ongoing attempt to make sense of where I stand on violence, revolution and the activists who espouse violent revolution as a first option.

I don’t care if you’re pro-Bernie, Uhuru, Marxist… if violent revolution’s your default, you should spend time in a developing or warring nation. If you’re from the US, have never left it and recently woke up, you have no business calling for violent revolution.
Go some place you have to use the phone book or memory, where you don’t know which day the water will be cut off… some place with no AC.
Some place with crumbling roads and with limited or nonexistent infrastructure (where it exists). Some place the customer is never right.
Go some place where corruption is the norm and where access to clean water and a full night’s sleep is a luxury for the rich.

If you’d like to continue traveling, now that you’ve gotten used to cold showers and corruption, explore guerilla and government violence.

Add food insecurity into the mix and nonexistent healthcare.

If after you’ve collected those passport stamps and you’re physically fit enough to not weigh down your comrades, you still want violence, have at it, hoss.

Until then, quit trying to onboard folks to your suicide mission and accept that revolution’s not a destination. Do what you do and let other folks and organizations do what they do.

Find common ground and quit perpetuating scarcity paradigms.